Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Stomach & Esophageal Cancers

Stomach Cancer

Treatment for stomach cancer is based on several factors including a patient’s overall health and medical history, the extent (severity) of the disease, and other individual factors. Treatment may include:

Surgery

Surgery may be necessary to remove cancerous tissue, as well as nearby noncancerous tissue. The most common operation for stomach cancer is called gastrectomy. If part of the stomach is removed, it is called a subtotal or partial gastrectomy. If the entire stomach is removed, it is called a total gastrectomy.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy is the use of high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells and to shrink tumors.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to treat cancerous cells. In most cases, chemotherapy works by interfering with the cancer cell’s ability to grow or reproduce.

Esophageal Cancer

Treatment for esophageal cancer is based on several factors including a patient’s overall health and medical history, the extent (severity) of the disease, and other individual factors. Treatment may include:

Surgery

Two types of surgery are commonly performed for esophageal cancer. In one type of surgery, part of the esophagus and nearby lymph nodes are removed, and the remaining portion of the esophagus is reconnected to the stomach. In the other surgery, part of the esophagus, nearby lymph nodes, and the top of the stomach are removed. The remaining portion of the esophagus is then reconnected to the stomach.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy is the use of high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells and to shrink tumors.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to treat cancerous cells. In most cases, chemotherapy works by interfering with the cancer cell’s ability to grow or reproduce.