Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Jose G. Romano, M.D.

General Information

Jose G. Romano, M.D.

Languages

  • English
  • Spanish

Certifications

  • American Board of Psych & Neuro-Neurology
  • American Board of Psych & Neuro-Vascular Neurology

Specialties

  • Neurology-Psychiatry & Neurology

Roles

  • Chief, Stroke Division
  • Professor of Clinical Neurology

Clinical Interests

Stroke prevention, acute stroke treatment, neurovascular ultrasound, visual loss after neurologic injury

Research Interests

Embolism, subarachnoid hemorrhage, restitution of visual loss after stroke

Education

1997 Fellowship
Cerebrovascular Diseases, Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami-Affiliated Medical Education Program
1995 Residency
Neurology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami-Affiliated Medical Education Program
1991 M.D.
Universidad Anahuac

Publications

Biography

 

Dr. Jose Romano is Professor of Neurology in the Cerebrovascular Division at the University of Miami, Department of Neurology.
 
Dr. Romano is a native of Mexico where he completed his medical studies, graduating in 1991 from the Universidad Anahuac in Mexico City. He subsequently trained in Neurology at Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami, followed by fellowship training in Neuromuscular Diseases and Cerebrovascular Diseases. He is board certified in Neurology and Vascular Neurology. He has been at the University of Miami, Department of Neurology Cerebrovascular Division, since 1997. Dr. Romano is the Director of the Cerebrovascular Division and Associate Chair for Clinical Affairs of the Department of Neurology.
 
Dr. Romano’s practice involves stroke prevention, acute stroke therapy, and rehabilitation of visual field defects. The Cerebrovascular Division also has interests in neurosonology, including extracranial and transcranial ultrasound, emboli detection, shunt detection and vasomotor reactivity studies. His current research interests include intracranial atherosclerotic disease, small vessel disease, and rehabilitation of hemianopsia.

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