Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D.

General Information

Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D.

Languages

  • English
  • Spanish

Certifications

  • American Board of Internal Medicine
  • American Board of Internal Med-Cardiovascular Disease

CV

Specialties

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiovascular Disease - Internal Medicine

Roles

  • Director, UM/Florida Heart Research Institute Cardiovascular Genomics Laboratory
  • Professor of Pharmacology, Medicine and Pediatrics

Clinical Interests

Dr. Bishopric's clinical interests include: congestive heart failure, genetics of heart failure, coronary artery disease, women with heart disease, cardiovascular consultation, exercise stress testing, and echocardiography.

Research Interests

Dr. Bishopric's Laboratory research focus is on the molecular regulation of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and cell turnover. Cardiac hypertrophy (cellular enlargement) and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are common outcomes of stress in the myocardium. To some extent, the heart is able to replace lost cells through activation of stem cells within the heart. We are currently looking at molecular pathways regulating the growth and death of these cells, using models of pathological stress in cell culture and in vivo. or bioenergetic function. We are also investigating molecular effectors of hypertrophy and heart failure, using a bioinformatics approach to generate and interpret transcription profiles from a variety of gene-targeted mouse models. A current focus is on the histone acetyltransferase p300, which we have shown to play a direct and rate-limiting role in pathological cardiac growth.

Awards

Researcher of the Year
First Prize
Established Investigator Award
Excellence Award
Post-doctoral Fellowship
Merck/American College of Cardiology Fellowship
Postdoctoral Fellowship
Phi Beta Kappa
National Merit Scholarship Finalist

Education

1987 Post-Doctoral Fellowship
Stanford University
1985 Clinical Fellowship
University of California
1983 Residency
University of Florida
1981 Clinical Fellowship
Duke University
1980 Internship
University of Florida
1979 M.D.
Duke University School of Medicine
1973 B.A.
Duke University

Biography

Nanette H. Bishopric, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.H.A., is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Miami (UM), a practicing cardiologist in the UM Medical Group, and Director of UM Cardiovascular Genomics Laboratory. She holds a B.A. degree in Music Performance-Magna cum Laude and an M.D., both from Duke University. Dr. Bishopric became interested in research during medical school, while working on a Howard Hughes fellowship in the laboratories of Dr. Robert Lefkowitz. She received postgraduate clinical training in Internal Medicine at University of Florida-Gainesville and was a clinical Cardiology fellow at UC San Francisco from 1983-1985. In 1986, Dr. Bishopric won the Merck/ACC Fellowship Award and an NIH postdoctoral fellowship allowing her to pursue research in molecular biology in the laboratories of Drs. Charles Ordahl and Laurence Kedes. From 1989-1996 she was Assistant Professor of Medicine at the UC San Francisco, concurrently serving as a member of the Voluntary Clinical Faculty in Cardiology at Stanford University under Dr. Victor Dzau, and as Sr. Scientist at SRI International. Research honors include the SRI International Technical Excellence Award, the Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association, and the 2005 "Stop Heart Disease" Researcher of the Year Award from the FL Chapter of the American College of Cardiology. She is a regular peer reviewer for NIH and American Heart Association, and serves on the Editorial Boards of Circulation and Circulation Research. Her research is currently supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Fondation Leducq (Paris) and Florida Heart Research Institute, focusing on molecular genetic effectors of hypertrophy, heart cell death and renewal. Dr. Bishopric's newest goal is to move the most important recent findings in this area to proof of concept in man.

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