Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

News

UM/Sylvester Announces New Board of Governors’ Chair

03.21.2007

The University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center is pleased to announce that Joan B. Scheiner has accepted the position of chair of the Board of Governors effective March 21. Scheiner succeeds Joaquin F. Blaya, who has served as the Board’s chair since 2000.

Nobel Laureate UM Researcher Identifies a Protein Receptor that Powerfully Stimulates Growth

03.12.2007

New research from the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center shows that a protein receptor activated by a growth hormone plays a key role in the growth of a variety of cancers. This could have a major impact on cancers that are fueled by hormones, like most breast and prostate cancers. Nobel laureate Andrew V. Schally, Ph.D., M.D., M.S., a professor in the Department of Pathology and the Division of Hematology-Oncology at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, has long been a leader in the study of hormone-related cancers. He and his colleagues showed that a splice variant (SV1) of a hormone receptor stimulated breast cancer cells in the laboratory. The research is published in the March 12 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

UM/Sylvester Scientists Develop a Key Research Tool That will Help Yield Treatments

03.12.2007

New research from the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center has clearly identified the role of a single gene in the development of a cancer that is prevalent in people with HIV/AIDS, and has created a valuable research model to confirm it. Enrique A. Mesri, Ph.D., member of the UM/Sylvester Viral Oncology Research Program and associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the UM Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, and his colleagues are the first to conclusively link this gene with its ability to fuel Kaposi’s sarcoma, a cancer common to people with compromised immune systems such as HIV/AIDS and organ transplant patients. They isolated the role of the gene through the creation of a novel animal model that realistically creates an environment close to how Kaposi’s sarcoma develops in humans. The work is published in the March 12 issue of the journal Cancer Cell.