Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center


Omar Nelson, Ph.D., running in the Fitbit Miami Marathon.

Sylvester Researcher Runs to Fight Cancer and Bring Communities Together


Omar Nelson, Ph.D., was giving it his all — “you always save something for the end” — as he crossed the finish line at the Fitbit Miami Marathon on Sunday, January 28. Still, he had good reason to be tired. He had not only completed the grueling 26.2-mile run, but also the 13.1-mile half marathon earlier in the morning — 39.3 miles total. He was the first person ever to run both races back to back.

From left, Enrique A. Mesri, Ph.D., Consul General Marcelo Martin Giusto, Edward Abraham, M.D., and Stephen D. Nimer, M.D.

Argentina Consulate Celebrates Research Collaboration with Sylvester and CFAR


The Consul General of Argentina in Miami came to the medical campus last week to pay tribute to the consortium of researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, the University of Miami Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) and institutions in Argentina that was awarded a prestigious National Cancer Institute U54 grant to study AIDS-related malignancies while developing the careers of junior researchers in Argentina.

Sylvester Researchers Recruiting Healthy Women for Ovarian Cancer Early Detection Study


Often referred to as the “silent killer,” ovarian cancer does not become symptomatic for many women until a late stage of the disease. So any advance that shifts detection earlier, and allows physicians to intervene when survival remains potentially longer, can be welcome news. Sylvester researcher Brian Slomovitz, M.D., and colleagues are conducting a biomarker study to improve early detection, and survival.

Researchers Uncover Evidence of Early Genomic Aberrations in Uveal Melanoma


Researchers from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have uncovered evidence that genomic aberrations in uveal melanoma that lead to metastasis may occur far earlier in tumor evolution than previously believed. The findings fundamentally change the thinking about how this eye cancer progresses.